WildCat

The World’s Fastest Quadruped Robot

WildCat - the fastest quadruped robot on Earth. It runs 32 km/h while maneuvering and maintaining its balance. WildCat uses a galloping gait much like a dog or horse and leans into turns in order to maintain traction and balance.
1.17 m
Height
154 kg
Weight
Methanol Engine
Power
Hydraulic
Actuation
Terrain Scanning Laser
Perception
14
Joints

About WildCat


The WildCat robot is the fastest free running quadruped robot in the World, running at 32 km/h. The previous record was 21 km/h, set in 1989 at MIT.

WildCat is powered by a methanol burning engine that drives a hydraulic actuation system (and makes a whale of a noise.) The robot uses a variety of gaits, including trotting, bounding, and galloping to maintain its balance while running and maneuvering over relatively flat terrain. The on-board computer uses dynamic control algorithms and a variety of sensors (IMU, ground contract, proprioception, visual odometry) to control and stabilize the running motion.  It uses a set of laser range finders to accurately measure the robot’s height and attitude above the ground.

The control system that stabilizes WildCat was first developed on Cheetah, a laboratory prototype that ran 48 km/h, faster than Usain Bolt.  (Cheetah ran indoors on a treadmill with no wind load, was constrained to move in a plane and was powered by a very large remote power supply.)

WildCat development was funded by DARPA's Maximum Mobility and Manipulation program.

More photos of WildCat